Ходжа Н. (hojja_nusreddin) wrote,
Ходжа Н.
hojja_nusreddin

William Chittick, "77 whole ghazals from Rumi's Divan, translated in English". Part 1/2

Part 1. To Part 2: http://hojja-nusreddin.livejournal.com/2964311.html
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INDEX (p. 387)
##. F-####: Chittick p. #

01. F-0096: p. 336-337
02. F-0120: p. 339
03. F-0123: p. 296-297
04. F-0127: p. 159-160
05. F-0144: p. 142
06. F-0182: p. 226
07. F-0312: p. 156-157
08. F-0338: p. 337
09. F-0374: p. 216-217
10. F-0385: p. 105-106
11. F-0391: p. 332
12. F-0419: p. 303
13. F-0515: p. 332-333
14. F-0586: p. 217
15. F-0657: p. 299-300
16. F-0695: p. 342-343
17. F-0742: p. 306-307
18. F-0797: p. 142-143
19. F-0817: p. 146-147
20. F-0869: p. 162-163
21. F-0907: p. 261
22. F-0972: p. 218
23. F-0981 (A 125): p. 270-271
24. F-1000: p. 284
25. F-1135: p. 329-331
26. F-1145 (A 147, N 25): p. 347-348
27. F-1160: p. 313
28. F-1163: p. 147
29. F-1169: p. 296
30. F-1196: p. 339-340
31. F-1244: p. 338
32. F-1310: p. 141-142
33. F-1331: p. 219
34. F-1374: p. 345-346
35. F-1375: p. 346-347
36. F-1400: p. 208-209
37. F-1407: p. 300-301
38. F-1426: p. 343-344
39. F-1436: p. 228
40. F-1451: p. 260
41. F-1553: p. 340-341
42. F-1601: p. 180-181
43. F-1647: p. 327
44. F-1648: p. 321-322
45. F-1671: p. 156
46. F-1695: p. 342
47. F-1705 (AA 213): p. 309-310
48. F-1716: p. 320
49. F-1723: p. 345
50. F-1739 (AA 217): p. 157-158
51. F-1747: p. 348-349
52. F-1767: p. 343
53. F-1869 (AA 231): p. 219-220
54. F-1911: p. 337-338
55. F-1931: p. 230
56. F-1945: p. 282-283
57. F-2056: p. 334-335
58. F-2073: p. 336
59. F-2102: p. 186
60. F-2206: p. 160
61. F-2243: p. 300
62. F-2251: p. 234
63. F-2293 (AA 291): p. 141
64. F-2331 (AA 297): p. 267
65. F-2509 (AA 321): p. 302-303
66. F-2602: p. 228-229
67. F-2675: p. 293-294
68. F-2730: p. 140
69. F-2742: p. 324-325
70. F-2744: p. 323
71. F-2879: p. 335-336
72. F-2936: p. 283-284
73. F-2996: p. 341-342
74. F-3003: p. 149-150
75. F-3041: p. 218-219
76. F-3067: p. 331-332
77. F-3072: p. 344-345

_______________ GHAZALS _______________________________

01. F-0096: p. 336-337

1
Pollute not your lips by kissing every mouth and eating every food!
Then the Beloved's lips will make them drunk and feed them sugar.
2
Your lips will be freed from the odor of the lips of "others"
And your love will be made transcendent, pure and one.
3
The lips that kiss the ass's arse,
How should the Messiah bless them with his sugar kiss?
4
Know that everything, other than the eternal light, has newly come into existence.
Why do you sit upon a heap of new dung and ask for contemplation?
5
When the manure has been annihilated in the heart of the vegetable patch,
Then it will be freed from its dinginess and add savor to food.
6
As long as you are excrement, how will you know the joy of sanctification?
Pass beyond your dung-nature and go to the Blessed and Transcendent!
7
When the Messiah held back his hand from every sour stew,
His hand became the remedy of all the world.
8
When Moses washed his hands and lips of Pharaoh’s bounty,
The Ocean of Generosity gave him the White Hand. (Koran 7:108)
9
If you want to escape the stomach and lips of all the unripe,
Be full of pearls but bitter on the surface, like the ocean.
10
Take heed! Turn your eyes away from others, for that Eye is jealous.
Take heed! Keep your stomach empty, for He has set for you a table.
11
If a dog has eaten its fill, it will not catch any game,
For the running and racing of aspiration derives from hunger's fire.
12
Where are a pure heart and pure lips to receive a pure cup?
Where is an agile Sufi to run after the halva?
13
Display the Realities in these words of mine,
Oh He, who passes us the wine and cup!
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02. F-0120: p. 339

1
How long will you move backwards? Come forward!
Enter not into unbelief, come to religion!
2 - 1355
Behold the elixir hidden within the venom -- come to the venom!
And come, return to the root of the root of your own self!
3
Although in form you are earthly,
You have been kneaded from certainty's substance.
4
You guard the treasury of God's Light – so come,
Return to the root of the root of your own self!
5
Once you have tied yourself to selflessness,
You will be delivered from selfhood,
6
And released from the ties of a hundred snares – so come,
Return to the root of the root of your own self!

7 – 1360 (the beit is missed by Chittick, inserted here from Gamard's translation)
You were born from the generations of (Adam, who was) an Appointed Deputy (of God)6,
(Yet) you have opened an eye to this base world.
8 (the beit is missed by Chittick, inserted here from Gamard's translation)
How sad that you are happy with (only) this amount for yourself!
Come, at last, to the Source of the source of your own self!

9
Though you are the talisman, protecting the world's treasure,
Within yourself, you are the Mine [of Heavenly Jewels].
10
Open your hidden eyes and come,
Return to the root of the root of your own self!
11
You were born of the rays of God's majesty and
Have gained the good fortunes of your auspicious star.
12 - 1365
How long will you suffer at the hands of nonexistent things?
Come! Return to the root of the root of your own self!
13
You are a ruby in the midst of granite –
How long will you try to deceive us?
14
We can see the truth in your eyes -- so come,
Return to the root of the root of your own self!
15
You came here from the presence of that haughty Friend,
So you are drunk, gentle, and heart-ravishing,
16
And your eyes are sweet and full of fire – so come,
Return to the root of the root of your own true self!
17 - 1370
The king and Saki, Shams-i Tabrizi,
has placed before you the everlasting cup.
18
Glory be to God! What marvelous pure wine!
So come, return to the root of the root of your own self!

_____________________________________________________________________
03. F-0123: p. 296-297

1
I saw that good and beautiful King,
That Eye and Lamp of the breast,
2
That Intimate and Comforter of the heart,
That spirit-increasing Spirit and World.
3
I saw Him, who gives
Intellect to the intellect and purity to purity,
4
That Object of adoration for the moon and the heavens,
That Kiblah of the spirits of the saints.
5
Each one of my particles called out with its own voice:
- "All praise be to God and thanksgiving!"

* * *
6
When Moses suddenly saw that Light from the bush, he said:
- "I have been delivered from seeking! For I have been given this gift".
7
God said[1]: "Oh Moses, leave aside traveling!
Throw down thy staff!"
8
At once Moses cast out from his heart
Friends, fellows, and kin.
9
This is the significance of “put off thy two shoes”[2]:
"Cut off thy love from the two worlds!"
10
The house of the heart has no room for any but God –
The heart knows the jealousy of the prophets.
11
God said[3]: "Oh Moses, what is that in thy hand?"
He (Moses) replied[4]: "That is my staff for the road".
12
He (God) said[5]: "Cast it down,
And see the marvels of heaven!"
13
He (Moses) threw it down and it became a serpent[6];
When he saw the serpent he fled.
14
God said[7]: "Take it and I will
Make it your staff once more,
15
I will make your enemy your assistant,
Your adversary your support.
16
Then you will know that faithful and gentle friends
Derive only from my bounty.
17
When we give pain to your hands and feet,
They become serpents in your eyes.
18
Oh hand, seize naught but Us!
Oh foot, seek naught but the Goal!
19
Flee not from the suffering We inflict,
For wherever you find suffering, there also you find a way to the remedy".

* * *
20
No one has ever fled from suffering,
Without finding something worse in return.
21
Flee from the bait -- that is where fear lies.
Leave fear of places for the intellect.
22
Shams of Tabriz has shown his gentleness,
But when he went away, he took it with him.
____________________
Notes by prof. Chittick:
1. Koran (27 : 10)
2. Koran (20 : 12)
3. Koran (20 : 17)
4. Koran (20 : 18)
5. Koran (20 : 19)
6. Koran (20 : 20)
7. Koran (20 : 21)
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04. F-0127: p. 159-160

1
Where is the knowing, nimble Minstrel of Love?
He who plays only for Love, accepting no one's request?
2
I have died hoping for Him, but have not seen Him;
I have entered the grave in my desire.
3
Oh dear friend, if you have seen Him, how good for you!
Oh friend, indeed, how good for you!
4
But if He is hidden, like Khidr*,
Alone, upon the shores of the sea,
5
Then, oh wind, take our salaam to Him!
For my heart is in tumult over Him.
6
I know that burning salaams
Take lovers to their Beloved.
7
Love makes the millwheel of the heavens spin, not water;
Love makes the moon go forward, not feet.
8
In remembrance, the millwheel of spirits
Begins to turn through the water of the eyes.
9
Remembrance is the noose of union with the Beloved.
Be silent, for madness has begun to boil!
___________________
* In the story of Moses and Khidr in the Koran (18:61-83), Moses sets out searching for the mysterious Khidr, whom God "had taught knowledge preceding from Us". (Koran 18:66).
Moses says: "I will not give up until I reach the meeting of the two seas; though I go on for many years". (Koran 18:61).
Here the reference to Khidr's being hidden by the sea seems to allude to this Koranic verse and the difficulty of finding access to him in general.
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05. F-0144: p. 142

1
Can the intellect perceive thee, or love, or the pure spirit?
Does the Guarded Tablet* know thee, do the angels in heaven?
2
Do Gabriel or Jesus or Moses even see thee in their dreams?
Is the celestial sphere worthy to be thy abode, or the Lote Tree of the Far Boundary**?
3
Moses' Mount Sinai has become blood many times in love's madness,
Because an echo of Lord Shams al-Din's fame fell upon it.
4
The Jealousy of the One has woven radiance upon radiance over his face.
Muhammad's spirit shouts: "Oh, how I desire to meet Him!"***
5
God's Jealousy would burn the two worlds to a cinder,
If a single hair of his beauty were to appear to us without veil.
6
His beauty has shone forth from behind a hundred thousand veils.
The spirit has fallen to shouting: "Welcome, oh king, welcome!"
7
The elegant cypress has bent itself double in prostrating itself before Tabriz;
Tiny Suha**** shines forth over Tabriz, like a sun.
_____________________
* The Guarded Tablet (lawh-i mahfuz), mentioned in the Koran (85 : 22), as the locus wherein the Koran is inscribed, is usually interpreted in a cosmological sense to mean the Universal Soul, the passive pole of spiritual existence. Within it the Pen -- the Universal Intellect -- inscribes the knowledge of all things, which are to come into existence. As a result, the created universe is born.
No one is able to tamper with its contents during the period of its revelation. It is well guarded and well protected in a tablet placed in the supervision of the Almighty.
** Lote Tree of Far Boundary:
http://hojja-nusreddin.livejournal.com/2932230.html
*** The Prophet said: "Oh how I desire to meet my brothers", a saying (hadith) that is taken to refer to the saints, who would be born in coming generations.
**** Suha – the star Alcor, ancient people tested their eyesight by this star.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mizar_and_Alcor
http://hojja-nusreddin.livejournal.com/2936394.html
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06. F-0182: p. 226

1
Do not remain a man of intellect among the lovers,
Especially if you love that sweet-faced Beloved.
2
May the men of intellect stay far from the lovers,
May the smell of dung stay far from the east wind!
3
If a man of intellect should enter, tell him the way is blocked;
But if a lover should come, extend him a hundred welcomes!
4
By the time intellect has deliberated and reflected,
Love has flown to the seventh heaven.
5
By the time intellect has found a camel for the hajj,
Love has circled the Kaaba.
6
Love has come and covered my mouth:
"Throw away your poetry and come to the stars!"
_______________________
http://sunlightgroup.blogspot.com/2009/06/sunlight-throw-away-your-intellect.html
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07. F-0312: p. 156 - 157

1
By your spirit, leave not the work at hand! Sleep not!
Subtract one night from your life and maintain the vigil: Sleep not!
2
You have slept a thousand nights for the sake of your own self-will:
What of a single night? For the sake of the Friend, sleep not!
3
For the sake of that Gentle Friend, who sleeps not by night,
Do the same! Entrust your heart to Him and sleep not!
4
Fear that night of illness when, until daytime, you lament
And groan piteously: "Oh Lord! Oh Lord!" Sleep not!
5
That night, when Death comes and says: "Welcome!"
By the bitterness of that night, oh traveler, sleep not!
6
Stones melt before those chains of awesomeness:
If you are not a stone, then remember those chains and sleep not!
7
Although night is a lovely black-skinned saki,
Take not her cup and fear the morning after: Sleep not!
8
God said: "At night My friends do not sleep".
If you are embarrassed and ashamed at His words, sleep not!
9
Fear that tremendously terrible night with no refuge:
Make night your provision on the way and beware! Sleep not!
10
You have heard that the saints find their desire at night;
For the love of that King, who satisfies desires, sleep not!
11
When your kernel dries out, He will give you a fresh kernel,
You will become all kernel, oh hopeful man, so sleep not!
12
I have told you a thousand times: Be silent! But you do not benefit.
Bring one and take a hundred thousand in return. Sleep not!
_______________________________________________________
08. F-0338: p. 337

1
Samaa is only for the restless spirit,
So jump up quickly, why do you wait?
2
Do not sit here with your own thoughts,
If you are a man, go to the Beloved.
3
Do not say: "Perhaps He does not want me".
What business has a thirsty man with such words?
4
Does the moth think about the flames?
For Love's spirit, thought is disgrace.
5
When the warrior hears the sound of the drum,
At once he is worth ten thousand men!
6
You have heard the drum, so draw your sword without delay!
Your spirit is the sheath of the all-conquering Dhul-Faqar*!
7
Strike the sword and take the kingdom of Love,
For Love's kingdom will last forever.
8
You are Husayn at Karbala, think not of water**!
The only "water" you will see today is a sword of the first water!
_____________________
* Dhul-Faqar is the name of Ali's sword.
** "Water" is always called to mind by the mention of Husayn's death at Karbala, since the army, which surrounded his small band,
did not allow Husayn's followers access to the river in spite of their great thirst.
_______________________________________________________
09. F-0374: p. 216-217

1
Someone asked: "What is the Way?"
I said: "This way is to abandon desires."
2
Oh lover of the King! Know that your way is
To seek the pleasure of that Generous Lord.
3
When you seek the Beloved's desire and pleasure,
Seeking your own desire is forbidden.
4
The spirit will be totally transformed into love for the Beloved,
For the ascetic cell of the noble travelers is Love.
5
His Love is not less than the top of some mountain.
His Love's mountaintop is enough for me!
6
The cave, where you can find the Friend, is Love.
Then the spirit will gain the adornment of Love's beauty.
7
Whatever purifies you is the correct road.
I will not try to define it.
8
Be silent and hold fast to the shaykh Love,
For in the two worlds, he is your leader.
_______________________________________________________
10. F-0385: p. 105-106

1
After your death, your good traits will run on ahead of you;
Like moon-faced ladies, those attributes will stroll gracefully.
2
One will take your hand, another will ask after you, and still another
Will bring you offerings of ruby lips and sugar kisses.
3
Once you have divorced the body, you will see houris
Lined up, submissive, obedient, penitent, devout. (Koran 66:5)
4
Uncountable, your traits run before your casket, your patience
Has become those, that pluck out, your gratitude those that draw out. (Koran 79:1-2)
5
In the grave those pure attributes become your intimate friends,
Clinging to you, like sons and daughters.
6
The warp and weft of your obedience will weave you many robes;
The expanse of your spirit will be displayed outside the six directions.
7
Take heed! Be quiet, so that you may plant the seeds of good works,
For the Garden of Eden will grow up from the acts of faithful servants.
_______________________________________________________
11. F-0391: p. 332

1
Oh minstrel, play this tune: "Our Friend has come drunk,
Pure and faithful Life has come drunk!"
2
If, like sparks, He should put on the robe of Severity,
I will know Him, for He has come drunk to us in that guise many times!
3
If He should pour out my water and break my jug,
Say nothing, oh brother, for this Water-carrier has come drunk!
4
I try to deceive my Drunkard, and He smiles:
"Look at this simple man, from whence has he come drunk?
5
Are you trying to deceive that Person, the least of whose words
Makes water and fire selfless, earth and air drunk?"
6
I said to Him: "If I die and Thou comest to my grave,
I will jump up shouting: 'That sweet-faced Beloved has come drunk'!"
7
He said: "How should the spirit of him, who receives this breath die?
He, who is drunk with God, subsists with Him forever."
8
Behold ineffable Love, filling the cuplike spirit! Behold the Face of the Saki,
Who has come from the realm of Subsistence, laughing and drunk.
9
Everyone in the world has chosen a friend, and ours is Love.
From the time of Alast It has been drunk without you and me.
_______________________________________________________
12. F-0419: p. 303

1
That thieving Heart-ravisher gave me a kiss and went!
What would have happened if instead of one He had given me six or seven?
2
Every lip He kisses bears its marks:
It splits and cracks from His lips' sweetness.
3
Another mark is, that mad desire for the lip of the Water of Life.
Makes Love stir up a thousand fires and furnaces every instant.
4
Still another mark is that the body, like the heart,
Runs after that kiss with haste and speed.
5
It becomes slender and delicate, like the Friend's lips!
How marvelous! Slenderness from the fire of a boundless Beloved!
_______________________________________________________
13. F-0516 (error in Chittick: F-0515): p. 332-333

1
Again we have returned from the tavern drunk,
Again we have escaped from above and below.
2
All of the drunkards are joyful and dancing;
Clap your hands, oh idols, clap! Clap!
3
The fish and the sea are all intoxicated,
For the hooks are the tips of Thy tresses!
4
Our Ruins have been turned upside down,
The vat has been upset and the jar broken.
5
When the shaykh of the Ruins saw this tumult,
He came to the roof and jumped.
6
A wine began to ferment, making
Existence nonexistent and nonexistence existent.
7
The glasses broke and the pieces fell in every direction;
How many drinkers wounded their feet!
8
Where is he, who cannot discern his head from his feet?
He has fallen drunk in the lane of Alast.
9
The wine-worshipers are all busy with revelry;
Listen to the strumming of the lute, oh body-worshiper!
_______________________________________________________
14. F-0586: p. 217

1
He, who seeks felicity is one thing, the lover something else;
He, who loves his head has not the feet for Love.
2
How should Love's two fire-filled eyes, drowned in the liver's blood,
Search for the heart's desire and the spirits' subsistence?
3
The lover does not weep for his sorry state, nor does he rub
His eyes from heartache: he wants to be worse each instant.
4
He does not want a day of fortune, nor does he seek a night of ease;
His heart stays concealed between night and day, like dawn.
5
The world has two nests: good fortune and affliction by
God's Holy Essence; the lover is outside them both!
6
The ocean does not make him boil, for he is an unparalleled pearl.
His face has not come from the mine, even if it is yellow like gold.
7
In love with the spirit's King, how should the heart seek a kingdom?
Enraptured by His slender waist, how should the spirit seek a robe of honor?
8
Should a phoenix enter the world, the lover would not seek its shadow,
For he is drunk with love for that famous Phoenix.
9
If the world should become all sugar, his heart would still lament like the reed;
And if the Beloved should say "No!", he will still melt like sugar.
10
I asked my Lord about Shams al-Din of Tabriz, whose permanent abode
Is Love: "Why should such a king go on a journey?"
_______________________________________________________
15. F-0657: p. 299-300

1
Were a single mote of Thy Face to show itself,
Neither dervish cloak, nor Christian belt, would remain upon the earth.
2
When Thou showest Thy Face to anyone in the two worlds,
He is consumed by fire and left with no business, but Thy heartache.
3
If Thou shouldst throw off the veil from that beautiful Face,
No trace would remain of the faces of sun and moon.
4
With Love's wine, Thou puttest to sleep those consumed by fire;
None but Thou is confidant to the mysteries.
_______________________________________________________
16. F-0695: p. 342-343

1
This caravan is not bringing our baggage;
It has none of the fire of our Friend.
2
Though the trees have all turned green,
They have caught no scent of our spring.
3
Your spirit may be a rosegarden, but its heart
Has not been wounded by our thorn.
4
Your heart may be an ocean of realities, but its boiling
Does not compare with that of our shore.
5
Although the mountains are very steady,
By God, they do not have our steadiness.
6
The spirit drunk with the morning wine
Has not even caught a scent of our winesickness.
7
Venus herself, the minstrel of heaven,
Has not the capacity for our work.
8
Ask us about the lion of God;
Every lion has not our backbone.
9
Show not Shams-i Tabrizi's coin
To him, who has not our fineness!
_______________________________________________________
17. F-0742: p. 306-307

1
Out of jealousy, Love makes the lover appear like everyone's enemy.
Once It has made people reject him, he turns to It.
2
He, who is worthy of the creatures is not worthy for Love;
Only the whore's soul marries a hundred husbands.
3
Since the lover is not suited for "others", let them all reject him;
Then the King of Love will make him His sitting companion.
4
When the creatures drive him from themselves, he cuts himself off
From their company; he accustoms his outward and inward to sweet-natured Love.
5
But when the creatures accept him, his mind drags him in their direction
And his heart turns furtively this way and that toward anyone's love.
6
When Love sees this It says: "My tresses have thrown a shadow,
So the lover smells there the fragrance of musk and ambergris.
7
I will make these two scents the enemy
Of his mind and brain, he will have to abandon both.
8
Though the lover has sniffed the musk in remembrance of Me,
Only a beginner on the Path wanders, like a child, saying: 'Where? Where?'
9
Once he has left childhood, he will open the eye of knowledge;
Why should he run to and fro on the river bank looking for water?"
10
If you have newly become a lover, take the bitter medicine and drink it,
So that Shirin may make you sweeter than Khusraw's honey*.
11
Perhaps Shams-i Tabrizi will intoxicate you
From beyond the two worlds and remove you from yourself!
__________________________
* King Khusraw and Shirin are a pair of lovers often celebrated in Persian verse.
Khusrawi (or "royal") honey was a famous kind of exquisite honey.
Shirin, whose name literally means "sweet", of course, represents the Beloved.
_______________________________________________________
18. F-0797: p. 142-143

1
From the day, the drunkards first felt the need for more wine,
The sheikh has held the cup of the spirit in his hands.
2
Like dust motes, we dance before him each morning;
Such is the custom of sun-worshipers.
3
Until Eternity-without-end his sun's face will display dawn after dawn,
Transmuting hearts of stone into precious rubies.
4
Oh Salah al-Din, oh "Rectitude of the Religion"* and the heart! Thou art outside
Of the six directions, otherwise, how hast thou made them all so luminous?
5
How could he, who is thy love's slave be cold in love for God?
For the rectitude of the religion and the heart is a burning fire!
6
If you need a heart, seek the pleasure of his heart!
But how should the heavy-spirited man seek his heart?
7
Oh, many a faith has become unbelief without him!
Oh, many an unbelief has become faith through his blessing!
8
You see that an ash heap is black-faced and black-hearted;
So whatever it says about that mine of gems is slander!
9
Shams-i Tabrizi! Thou art the king of all men of beautiful spirits!
Perhaps, Joseph of Canaan can rival thee in beauty.
______________________________________
Note by SS:
* Salah al Din (arab.) - Righteousness of the Faith.
_______________________________________________________
19. F-0817: p. 146-147 +

1
Since a group of people have bought my words,
The old rag sewers have all gone to work.
2
In order to set themselves up against me, they have all
Washed their beards; but their envy displays their dirty faces.
3
By day they make blandishments like fair maidens,
By night they repeat their lines like frogs.
4
Thanks be to God, that my voice has made
These sleepers abandon their slumber and stay awake.
5
But would they were staying awake for His sake,
That all their lamentation were not for the sake of silver and gold!
6
How can they restore the sick to ruddy complexions?
For they are all yellow like gold coins.
7
How can they deliver the creatures from envy?
For envy has made them all ill.
8
Those kings that have come for the sake of vision
Are like an illuminated eye in men's hearts.
9
Like the seven planets, their light is but one;
Like the five fingers, they perform a single task.
10
Not wanting people to mock them,
These fools show themselves as all turbans and beards.
11
The People of the Heart are the sun, the people of clay the dust in the air;
The former are the rose, the latter the thorn.
12
Grieve not, oh prince, because of these fools,
The People of the Heart, are heart-bestowers and heart-pleasers.
_______________________________________________________
20. F-0869: p. 162-163

1
The tailor of Time has never sewn a shirt
For any man without tearing it to pieces.
2
See a thousand simple fools in this world,
Paying Iblis skirts full of gold for pain.
3
These multicolored flowers that are sweetmeat to your eye,
You eat of them and they give you yellow cheeks.
4
Oh you, who have embraced a corpse saying: "My darling!"
In the end, embracing corpses will freeze body and soul.
5
Become accustomed to God, for when your appointed time arrives,
You will be parted unwillingly from these paintings of the devil.
6
Stretch not your legs on this sweet carpet of earth, for it is a borrowed bed:
Fear the time, when they come to roll it up!
7
Throw not the dice recklessly into this cup of Time!
Beware of your opponent, for he is a master at backgammon.
8
Behold not the dust of the body, gaze upon the mounted horseman of the spirit!
Use your vision to search for the horseman in the midst of the dust!
9
Faces like roses must come from a rosegarden;
If there is no rosery, from whence the flowers?
10
When you see the apple, the chink now that there must be a tree.
This apple serves as an exemplar, it is not to be eaten.
11
Keep your aspiration high, for if you keep it low,
The King's chamberlain will drive you away: "Begone!"
12
Silence! No more words! Speak without words,
Like the rational faculty of the angels upon the lapis lazuli roof.
_______________________________________________________
21. F-0907: p. 261

1
Give not my heart into separation's hand, for that is not seemly!
Kill not him who is dying for Thee! Kill him not, oh Idol, for that is not seemly!
2
In Gentleness, Thou hadst chosen me, why now hast Thou fled from me?
Oh Thou, who hast displayed faithfulness, be not cruel, for that is not seemly!
3
The treasurer of Thy Gentleness, gave me the robe of felicity.
Strip not that robe from my body, for that is not seemly!
4
My heart seems to be all face with no back. Turn not Thy Face
Away from me, turn not Thy back toward me, for that is not seemly!
5
I spoke of union with Thee. Thy Gentleness said: "Yes!"
After saying "Yes!", ask not "Why?" That is not seemly!
6
Thou art a mine of sugar and candy. Candy does not speak bitterness.
Speak not bitter words to our face, for that is not seemly!
7
Bring those words, each of which is like a spirit!
Hide not the lamp in the night, for that is not seemly!
8
Thy heartache, which has made me frail, is neither inside, nor outside the body.
Heartache is a placeless fire. Ask not "Where?", for that is not seemly!
9
My heart has come from the World of Ineffability. Thy Image - from the other side of the heart.
Separate not these two travelers, for that is not seemly!
10
Shut not the door of the house, glance at the Sufis!
Say: ''Welcome!" and do not eat rice alone, for that is not seemly!
11
Oh heart, sleep from thought, for thought is the heart's snare.
Go not to God, except disengaged from all things, for that is not seemly!
_______________________________________________________
22. F-0972: p. 218

1
Lovers, who die knowingly,
Die like sugar before their Beloved.
2
On the day of Alast they drank the Water of Life,
So they cannot die like others.
3
Since they have been resurrected in Love,
They do not die like these people in the crowd.
4
Through God's Gentleness they have passed beyond the angels
Far be it from them to die like humans!
5
Do you suppose that lions die like dogs,
Far from His Presence?
6
When lovers die in their journey,
The spirit's King runs out to meet them.
7
When they die at the feet of that Moon,
They all light up like the sun.
8
The lovers, who are each others' spirit,
Die in their mutual love.
9
The water of Love soothes their aching livers,
They all come and die in that heartache.
10
Each is an unparalleled orphan pearl,
They do not die next to mothers and fathers.
11
Lovers fly to the spheres,
Deniers die in the depths of the Blaze.
12
Lovers open the eye that sees the Unseen,
The rest all die blind and deaf.
13
In fear the lovers never used to sleep at night,
Now they all die without dread or danger.
14
Those, who worshiped fodder here,
Were all cows, they die like asses.
15
Those, who sought that vision today,
Die happy and laughing in vision's midst.
16
The King places them next to His Gentleness,
They do not die in the lowliness and insignificance, you see.
17
Those, who seek to acquire the virtues of Muhammad,
Die like Abu Bakr and Umar*.
18
Far from them is death and annihilation!
But I have sung this ghazal, supposing they were to die.
_______________________
* Abu Bakr and Umar, along with Uthman and Ali, were the closest companions of the Prophet and the first 4 caliphs of Islam.
_______________________________________________________
23. F-0981 (A 125): p. 270-271 $

1
My poetry is like Egyptian bread:
Night passes, and you cannot eat it.
2
Eat it while it is fresh,
Before the dust settles on it!
3
Its place is in the tropics of the awareness,
it dies in this world, because of the cold.
4
Like a fish, it flops a moment on dry ground.
A while later you see it lifeless.
5
If you eat it imagining it to be fresh,
You will have to paint many fantastic images.
6
You will devour your own imagination,
Not these ancient words, oh man!
_______________________________________________________
24. F-1000: p. 284

1
The red rose, which tears its cloak to shreds,
I, for one, know its motive.
2
The willow has let down its branches in straight rows,
To make up for all the ritual prayers it has missed.
3
The lily, with its sword, and the jasmine, with its shield,
Are preparing themselves for the holy war.
4
The poor nightingale, how he suffers!
He sighs at the rose's display.
5
Each of the lovely brides in the garden
Says: "The rose is glancing at me".
6
The nightingale replies: "The rose makes those
Amorous gestures for my sake, headless and footless me!"
7
The plane-tree has lifted up its hands in lamentation.
Shall I tell you what supplications he makes?
8
Who put the hat on the bud's head?
Who bent the violet over double?
9
Although autumn was very cruel,
Behold the faithfulness of spring!
10
Whatever autumn took in pillage,
Spring has come and replaced.
11
I speak of roses, nightingales and the beauties
Of the garden, as a pretext, why do I do it?
12
For the sake of Love's Jealousy,
At any rate, I am describing God's graces.
13
The pride of Tabriz and the world,
Shams al-Din, has again shown me favor.
_______________________________________________________
25. F-1135: p. 329-331

1
Bring wine*, oh Saki, may my head and turban be Thy sacrifice!
Bring the spirit's cup from wherever it is found!
2
Come drunk and strolling, goblet in hand, let it not be lawful
For Thee to be the Saki and us to be so sober!
3
Bring the cup, for my spirit in its desire has left me;
What place is this for patience and repose?
4
Bring the Cup of Life, whose nature is the same as Thine,
For it is the friend of wounded hearts and the confidant of the mysteries.
5
Were a drop of that wine to fall upon barren ground,
At once a rosegarden would blossom.
6
Were that ruby wine to bubble up at midnight,
Its lights would fill the heavens and the earth.
7
Marvellous wine! Marvellous flagon! Marvellous Saki!
May spirits be strewn before them, strewn!
8
Come, for in my heart secrets are concealed,
Pass around the ruby wine and leave not a single veil in place!
9
When Thou hast made me drunk,
Then behold how a lion-catcher enters the hunt!
10
Blessed God! What a moment! When our gathering is full
Of the cup's fragrance and the light of the Beloved's Face!
11
A thousand drunkards place their spirits on trays,
Like moths before the candle: "Take this, and bring wine!"
12
The sweet-voiced minstrels and shouting drunkards
Make the wine itself giddy in the Wine-seller's veins!
13
Behold the state of the young men of the cave, who drank it:
For three hundred nine years** they slept, ruined and drunk, in the cave!
14
What wine did Moses pour upon the sorcerers? Drunkenly,
They surrendered their hands and feet, like selfless men! (Koran 7:124)
15
What did the Egyptian women see in Joseph's face,
That made them cut their beautiful arms to shreds?
16
What did the Holy Saki pour upon Saint George's head***,
So that all heartache left him and he had no fear of the unbelievers?
17
They killed him a thousand times, yet he kept on going:
"I am drunk and unaware of 'one' or a 'thousand'!"
18
The Companions, who went naked before arrows,
Were ruined and drunk, because of Muhammad the Chosen.
19
No, wrong! For Muhammad was not the Saki,
He was a cup full of wine, and God was the Saki of the pious.
20
Which wine did the son of Adham**** drink? Why, like a drunkard,
He became disgusted with his rule and kingdom?
21
Which intoxication gave the call*****: "Glory to me!"?
Which - spoke the mystery******: "I am God", and went to the gallows?
22
The fragrance of that wine made water bright and pure,
Like a drunkard, it goes toward the ocean, making constant prostrations.
23
Love for this wine made the earth full of colors,
Its radiance lit up fire's sweet face.
24
If not for this wine, why did wind become an intimate and a tale bearer,
the animator of pastures and gardens and a book of saying?
25
What joy these four elements derive from mixing!
Look how plants, animals, and men are their result!
26
What awareness-taking wine has this black night?
For one cup of it knocks out the creatures.
27
Which Gentleness and handiwork of the Maker should I describe?
The Sea of His Power has no shore!
28
Let us drink the wine of Love and carry Love's burden,
Like a camel drunk in the midst of a caravan
29
Not such a drunkenness that will make you wish for intellect,
But one that will awaken both intellect and spirit.
30
The drunkards will vomit everything other than God,
For "other than God" is but headache and wine sickness.
31
How is this pure wine related to the wine of the grape?
This is the Water of Life, that other carrion.
32
For a while that wine makes you a pig, for a while a monkey,
In the end that red water makes you black faced.
33
The heart is the vat of God's wine, so remove its stopper:
The ill-mannered natural temperament has stopped it up with clay.
34
When you remove part of the clay from the top of the vat,
Its fragrance and a thousand benefits rise up.
35
If I should try to number those benefits,
I would not be able to count them by the Last Day.
36
Since we are incapable, let us rest with the Prophet's prayer: "I can't
Count Thy blessing!", since it is time to stop counting, lift the spirits cup!
37
Enter into the gathering of Shams al-Din's lovers!
For the sun in heaven steals light from his sun.
________________________________
* Wine drinking, intoxication, and revelry are images of union with the Beloved. Through wine the spirit discovers its true identity and attains to everlasting joy.

** "Companions of the Cave" - the story of the 7 sleepers of Ephesus, recounted in the Koran (18:9 ff.), where the length of their stay is also mentioned.

*** Saint George - in Islamic sources Jirjis, is said to have been a prophet, although historically he seems to be identical with Saint George, who was put to death by Diocletian in the year 303 AD.
According to the accounts, he was tortured to death many times, but each time returned to life.

**** Ibrahim ibn Adham - one of the great saints of early Islam. His life story is reminiscent of that of the Buddha.

***** "Glory be to me" - is a famous ecstatic utterance of Bayazid, interpreted by the Sufis along the same lines as Hallaj's "I am God".

****** "I am God" - the famous saying of the Sufi martyr, Hallaj, which and plays an important role in Rumi's teachings.
_______________________________________________________
26. F-1145 (A 147, N 25): p. 347-348 $

1
Look at me! I will be your intimate in the grave
On the night you pass from shop and home.
2
You will hear my salaams in the tomb and then
You will know that you were never hidden from my sight.
3
Behind your veil, I am like your intellect and awareness
At the time of joy and happiness, at the time of suffering and infirmity.
4
When you hear the voice of a friend on that lonely night,
You will be delivered from the striking of the serpents and the fear of the ants.
5
The winesickness of Love will bring you a gift in the grave:
Wine, witnesses, candles, kabobs, sweetmeat, and incense.
6
When we light intellect's lamp, what a shouting
And uproar will arise from the dead in their graves!
7
The dust of the graveyard will be bewildered by the shouting and uproar,
By the sound of the Resurrection's drum, by the tremendous tumult of the Uprising.
8
He, whose shroud is torn apart, will cover his ears in terror,
but what are brain and ears next to the blast of the Trumpet?
9
Wherever you look, you will see my form,
Whether you look at yourself or at that noise and confusion.
10
Flee from cross-eyed vision and straighten out your eyes,
For on that day, the evil eye will be far from my beauty!
11
Beware! Beware! Gaze not at my human form! Make no mistake,
For the spirit is terribly subtle and Love - terribly jealous!
12
What place is this for form?! Were the felt covering even a hundred fold,
The radiance of the spirit's mirror would show its banner.
13
Strike the drums and wind your way to the minstrels in the city!
The young men of Love's way are holding a day of purification.
14
If the blind men had sought out God instead of morsels and money,
Not one of them would be left, sitting on the edge of the moat.
15
Why have you opened a tale bearer's house in our city?
Be a shut-mouth tale bearer, like light!
_______________________________________________________
27. F-1160: p. 313

1
Show Thy Face to us! Conceal it not, oh Thou,
Who like the moon art famous throughout the seven heavens!
2
We are a group of lovers, whom desire
Has brought from a distant place on a journey.
3
Oh Thou, who hast within Thine own Spirit
Hundreds of thousands of paradises and houris and palaces!
4
Look down from the roof and behold
With kindliness this congregation of afflicted lovers!
5
Oh Saki of the Sufis! Give us a wine,
That does not come from vat or grapes!
6
Give that wine, whose ferment's fragrance
Pulls the dead out of their graves!
_______________________________________________________
28. F-1163: p. 147

1
Shame on the world's inhabitants, shame!
Look at these ignorant, unmanly thieves!
2
In their fine exterior you see ascetics,
But inwardly God does not inhabit the house!
3
For two farthings one can buy
Three or four assloads of these big ducks!
_______________________________________________________
29. F-1169: 296

1
Is there no one, with a pure and worthy vision,
With which to gaze upward?
2
If there no one, purified of this water and clay,
So that he may gaze upon the Ocean?
3
So that he may place his foot upon Mount Qaf,
And look upon the wing of the Phoenix?
4
So that the Sun may make his vision
Drunk and headless and footless?
5
Is there no one, who receives replenishment from Love's light,
So that his vision may fall totally Yonder?
6
Water becomes purified with water;
The man, who can see, gains vision from Vision.
7
Become nothing but vision, for in God's Court,
Nothing finds access, but vision!
_______________________________________________________
30. F-1196: p. 339-340

1
In truth, love for the Illuminator of hearts keeps
Lovers awake all night, without food and sleep.
2
Oh friend, if you are a lover, be like a candle:
Melt all night long, burn joyfully till morning!
3
He, who is like cold weather in autumn, is no lover;
In autumn's midst the lover's heart is burning summer.
4
Dear friend, if you have a love, you want to proclaim,
Then shout like a lover! Shout! Shout!
5
But if you are chained by sensuality, make no claims to Love;
Enter the spiritual retreat and burn away your chains!
6
Oh simple man, how can a lover be joined to sensuality?
How could Jesus eat from the same trough as his ass?
7
If you want to catch the fragrance of these symbols,
Then turn your eyes away from everything but Shams al-Din of Tabriz!
8
But if you cannot see that he is greater than the two worlds,
You are still a wretch, drowned in the ocean of heedlessness.
9
So go before the teachers of conventional knowledge, busy yourself with jurisprudence
And become a master of the science of ''This is permitted and that is forbidden".
10
My spirit has passed beyond childhood in love for Shams al-Din,
Love for him is not mixed with raisins and nuts.
11
My intellect has left me and my verses are incomplete,
That is why my bow has no more designs and wrappings.
12
Oh Jalal al-Din, sleep and abandon speech!
No leopard will ever catch that lion!
_______________________________________________________
31. F-1244: p. 338

1
Sanai*! If you do not find a friend, be your own friend! In this world
Of every kind of man and every kind of task, be a man for your own task!
2
Each member of this caravan is stealing his own baggage;
place your own self behind and sit before your baggage!
3
People sell ephemeral beauty and buy ephemeral love;
pass beyond those two dry riverbeds and be your own river!
4
These friends of yours keep on pulling you by the hand toward nonexistence;
steal back your hand and be your own helper!
5
These beauties, painted on canvas, veil the beauties of the heart;
Lift up the veil and enter: Be with your own Beloved!
6
Be with your own Beloved and be a well-thinking, good man!
Be more than the two worlds, dwell in your own domain!
7
Go, do not become drunk with the wine, that increases arrogance;
Behold the brightness of that Face and be soberly aware of your own Self!
_________________________
* Rumi is referring to Sanai's discussion of good and evil companions, in his "Hadiqat al-haqiqah" (ed. by M. Radawi, Tehran: Tahuri, 1329/1950, pp. 448 ff.).
More particularly, he is alluding to this line: "In this world are found a task for every man, and a man for every task" (p. 449, line 4).
_______________________________________________________
32. F-1310: p. 141-142

1
Oh mouthpiece of God! Oh eye of the Realities! Oh thou,
Who deliverest the creatures from this ocean full of fire!
2
Thou art a very ancient shaykh, a king unparalleled!
Take the spirit by the hand and free it from the affliction of its attachments!
3
In the way of self-sacrifice, thou huntest for spirits.
Alas, which of these spirits are worthy to be thy
prey?
4
Who indeed is the creature to brag of love for thee?
Oh, the light of the Creator's Majesty is in love with thy beauty.
5
You say: "What am I to do, for I am the prey of his love?
I am distressed and lovesick". Oh, thou art a skillful physician!
6
Thy gentleness says: "Come forward!" Thy severity says: "Go back!"
Let me know at once, which of them speaks the truth?
7
Oh sun of the spirits! Oh Shams of Tabriz, sun of God!
Every ray of thy sunbeams is a subtle and eloquent spirit!
_______________________________________________________
33. F-1331: p. 219

1
In God's eyes, whoever has no tint of Love,
Is naught, but wood and stone.
2
Love wrings water from rocks,
Love cleans rust from mirrors.
3
Unbelief has come in war, faith in peace;
Love strikes fire to both peace and war.
4
In the ocean of the heart, Love opens its mouth
And like a whale swallows down the two worlds.
5
Love is a lion, without deception and trickery,
Not a fox one moment and a leopard the next.
6
When Love provides replenishment upon replenishment,
The spirit gains deliverance from this dark and narrow body.
7
From the beginning, Love is all bewilderment;
It stuns the intellect and dazzles the spirit.
8
Oh east wind, my heart is in Tabriz;
Take my salaams there without delay!
_______________________________________________________
34. F-1374: p. 345-346

1
Oh lovers! Oh lovers! I turn dust into gems!
Oh minstrels! Oh minstrels! I fill your tambourines with gold!
2
Oh thirsty souls! Oh thirsty souls! Today I am giving water to drink!
I will transform this dustbin into paradise, a celestial pool.
3
Oh helpless men! Oh helpless men! Relief has come! Relief has come!
I turn everyone with a wounded and aching heart into a sultan, a Sanjar.
4
Oh elixir! Oh elixir! Look at me, for I transmute a hundred
Monasteries into mosques, a hundred gallows into pulpits!
5
Oh unbelievers! Oh unbelievers! I unfasten your locks!
For I am the absolute ruler: I make some people believers, others unbelievers!
6
Oh sir! Oh sir! You are wax in my hands! If you become a sword,
I will make you a cup; if you become a cup, I will make you into a sword.
7
You were a sperm-drop and became blood, then you gained this harmonious form;
Come to me, oh son of Adam! I will make you even more beautiful.
8
I turn grief into joy and guide the lost,
I make the wolf into Joseph and poison into sugar!
9
Oh sakis! Oh sakis! I have opened my mouth
In order to marry every dry lip to the lip of the cup!
10
Oh rosegarden! Oh rosegarden! Borrow roses from my rosery!
Then I will place your sweet herbs next to the lotus.
11
Oh heaven! Oh heaven! You will become even more bewildered than the narcissus,
When I make dust into ambergris, thorns into jasmine.
12
Oh Universal Intellect! Oh Universal Intellect! Whatever you say is true.
You are the ruler, you are munificent! Let me stop my speaking.
_______________________________________________________
35. F-1375: p. 346-347

1
I have returned, like the new year, to break the locks of the prison
And smash the claws and teeth of these man-eating spheres.
2
The seven waterless planets are devouring the creatures of earth;
I will throw water upon their fire and still their winds.
3
I have flown from the beginningless King, like a falcon,
In order to kill the parrot-eating owls of this ruined monastery.
4
From the beginning, I made a covenant to sacrifice my spirit to the King.
May my spirit's back be broken, should I break my pledge and covenant!
5
Today I am Asaf, Solomon's vizier, sword and firman in hand,
I will break the necks of any, who are arrogant before the King.
6
If you see the garden of the rebellious flourishing for a day or two,
Grieve not! For I will cut their roots from a hidden direction.
7
I will break nothing, but injustice or the evil-intentioned tyrant;
Should anything have a mote of savor, then I am an unbeliever, should I break it!
8
Wherever there is a polo ball, it is taken away by the mallet of Oneness;
If a ball does not roll down the field, I will smash it with the blow of my mallet.
9
I now reside in His banquet, for I saw that His intention is Gentleness.
I became the least servant of His way, in order to break Satan's legs.
10
I was a single nugget, but when the Sultan's hand grasped hold of me,
I became the mine. If you place me in the balance, I will break the scales.
11
When you allow a ruined and drunken man, like myself, into your house,
Do you not know at least this much: I will break this and break that?
12
If the watchman shouts: "Hey!", I will pour a cup of wine on his head;
And if the doorman seizes hold of me, I will break his arm.
13
If the spheres do not rotate round my heart, I will pull them up by the roots;
If the heavens act with villainy, I will smash the turning heavens.
14
Thou hast spread the tablecloth of Generosity and invited me to lunch.
Why doest Thou rebuke me, when I break the bread?
15
No, no, I sit at the head of Thy table, I am the chief of Thy guests.
I will pour a cup or two of wine upon the guests and break their shame.
16
Oh Thou, who inspirest my spirit with poetry from within!
Should I refuse and remain silent, I fear I would break Thy command.
17
If Shams-i Tabrizi should send me wine and make me drunk,
I would be free of cares and break down the pillars of the universe!
_______________________________________________________
36. F-1400: p. 208-209

1
I will run quickly, quickly, to reach the riders;
I will become nonexistent, nothing, to reach the Beloved.
2
I have become joyful, joyfulI am a spark of fire.
I will burn my house and travel to the Desert.
3
I will become dust, dirt, so that Thou canst make me verdant;
I will become water and prostrate myself all the way to the Rosegarden.
4
Fallen from the heavens, I waver like a dust mote;
I will attain security and stop my trembling, when I reach the Goal.
5
The spheres are a place of honor, the earth a place of destruction;
I will escape from these two dangers, when I reach the Sultan.
6
This world of earth and air is the substance of unbelief and annihilation;
I have entered the heart of unbelief, in order to reach faith.
7
That balanced and harmonious King of the world seeks a balanced lover;
My face is as yellow as gold coin, so that I may be placed in His Balance.
8
God's Mercy is water, it moves only towards low ground.
I will become dust and Mercy's object in order to reach the All-Merciful.
9
No physician gives pills and medicine without an illness;
I will become totally pain, so that I may reach the Remedy.
_______________________________________________________
37. F-1407: p. 300-301

1
What didst Thou drink last night? Tell me, my sugar-sweet Idol,
So that I may drink the same day and night, all year long, for the rest of my life.
2
If Thou misleadest me, Thy color will tell the tale;
Ever since I saw Thy color, my head has been stunned.
3
For a time pull up Thy reins, leave me not in haste!
Let my heart light up, let me gaze upon Thee to the full.
4
My heart is beating wildly, stay still for a moment!
The blood keeps dripping from my eyes, leave not my gaze in haste!
5
When I am far from Thee, I teach the earth to be dark and dismal;
But when I see Thee for an instant, I light up the azure heavens.
6
When the sun's cheek moves far from the earth's countenance,
Night must pull clown a black cloth of separation.
7
But when the sun shows itself in the morning, the earth dons white garments
Oh, Thy Face is the spirit's sun! Do not go far from me!
8
Be not a tyrant, oh Idol! Spill not my blood without cause!
Close not Thy heart toward me, oh Idol, smash not my gem!
9
Last night the cup placed Thy Image in my hand,
Before I saw Thee there, I had no desire for wine.
10
Thou hast given the heavens and earth a potion, through which they have grown fat;
Nurture me from Thine own Self, for I am emaciated!
11
Oh quarrelsome Idol, Thy quarreling has made even sugar drunk!
Thy Spirit is my spirit, Thy Star is my star!
12
I keep on telling my heart: "Drink blood and stay silent!"
But it just shrugs its shoulders: "You be silent, I'm deaf".
_______________________________________________________
38. F-1426: p. 343-344

1
How should you know what kind of King is my inward companion?
Look not at my yellow face, for I have less of iron!
2
I have turned my face totally to that King, who brought me here:
I have a thousand praises for Him, who created me.
3
One moment I am the sun, the next an ocean of pearls.
Inwardly I have the majesty of the spheres, outwardly the lowliness of the earth.
4
Within this jar of the world I wander like a bee;
Look not only at my wailful buzzing, for I have a house full of honey!
5
Oh heart, if you are seeking us, come up to the blue dome;
My palace is a fortress that gives me the security of the secure.
6
How awesome is the water, that turns the millstone of the heavens!
I am the water's whee, lthat is why my cries are so sweet!
7
Since you see that devils, mankind, and jinn all follow my command,
Can you not understand, that I am Solomon and that on my ring is a seal?
8
Why should I be withered? Every one of my particles has blossomed!
Why should I be an ass's slave? I am mounted upon Buraq!
9
Why should I be less than the moon? No scorpion has bit my foot!
Why should I not come out of this well? I have grasped a strong rope!
10
I have built a house for the spirit's pigeons, fly in this direction,
Oh bird of the spirit, for I possess a hundred inaccessible towers!
11
I am a ray of the Sun, though I wander about all these houses.
I am carnelian and gold and rubies, though I was born of water and clay!
12
Whatever pearl you see, seek another within it!
Every dustmote says: "Inwardly I am a treasure!"
13
Every jewel says to you: "Be not satisfied with my beauty,
For the light in my face derives from the candle of my awareness!"
14
I will be silent, for you have not the intelligence to understand.
Do not nod your head, try not to deceive me, for I have an eye, that discerns intelligence.
_______________________________________________________
39. F-1436: p. 228

1
Art Thou the sun, or Venus, or the moon? I don't know.
What dost Thou want from this bewildered madman? I don't know.
2
In this court of Ineffability all is Gentleness and Harmony;
What plain art Thou, what meadow, what court? I don't know.
3
In the celestial field, crossed by the Milky Way, the stars are gathered
About Thee like Turcomans. What tent art Thou? I don't know.
4
Thy Face has made my spirit roses, violets, narcissus, and lilies;
Thy Moon has illuminated my moon. What companion art Thou? I don't know.
5
What a marvellous ocean within the heart, full of fish and shoreless!
I have never seen such an ocean, I do not know such fish.
6
The kingship of creatures is a tale, as insignificant,
As a king cup. No king do I know, but that Subsistent King.
7
Marvellous, infinite Sun! All of Thy dustmotes are speaking!
Art Thou the Light of God's Essence? Art Thou God? I don't know.
8
Thy comeliness is burning the souls of a thousand Jacobs to cinders.
Oh Joseph of beauties, why art Thou in this well? I don't know.
9
Be silent! For you are a talebearer, you are drowned in constant change.
At one moment you are hu, at another ha, at another ah. I don't know.
10
I will be silent, for I am drunk from the spell, that has overcome me.
I do not know selflessness and intoxication from awareness.
_______________________________________________________
40. F-1451: p. 260

1
If you are not going to bed, then sit, I am going.
Tell your tale, I have told mine.
2
I have had enough of tales and am like a drunkard;
Slumber is making me lurch and fall in every direction.
3
Whether asleep or awake, I am thirsty for that Friend,
The companion and mate of His Image's form.
4
Like the form in a mirror, I follow that Face,
Displaying and concealing His Attributes.
5
When He laughs, I laugh,
And when He becomes agitated, so do I.
6
Say the rest Thyself, for the pearls of meaning, I have strung
On speech's necklace, derive from Thy Ocean.
========================================================

Abbreviations

A - A.J. Arberry, "Mystical Poems of Rumi", First Selection, Poems 1 - 200, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1968.
AA - A.J. Arberry et al., "Mystical Poems of Rumi", Second Selection, Poems 201 - 400, Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1979.
N - R.A. Nicholson, "Selected Poems from the Divani Shamsi Tabriz", Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1898; repr. 1961.
D - "Diwan-i Shams-i Tabriz", Badiuzzaman Furuzanfar ed., "Kulliyyat-i Shams ya diwan-i kabir", 10 vols, Tehran: University of Tehran Press, 1336-46 AH / 1957-67 AD.
- Italicized numerals refer to the number of the ghazal,
- Roman numerals refer to the number of the line;
- when a ghazal has been translated in its entirety, numbers of lines are not mentioned.
F-#: Furuzanfar's Ghazal #;
p. #: Chittick's page #.

NB

Prof. Chittick tried to avoid excessive quotations from the works previously translated in English, especially the "Mathnawi" and "Fihi ma fihi".
Therefor, he emphasized the untranslated ghazals, although material from other sources could also be quoted in abundance.
_______________________________________________________

Book:
- William Chittick, "The Sufi Path of Love: The Spiritual Teachings of Rumi"
, SUNY Press, ISBN: 0873957245, 1983, - 444 p.
- Уильям Читтик, "В поисках скрытого смысла. Суфийский путь любви. Духовное учение Руми", пер., сост., предисл. М. Степанянц, М.: Ладомир, ISBN: 586218113X, 1995, - 543 с.

Web:
English
:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/68857528/Sufi-Path-of-Love-Spiritual-Teachings-of-Rumi
Russian:
http://rumi.sufism.ru/chittik.html
http://www.gigabase.com/getfile/XLL2mfCDotn2zbvHwcIljgBB/В-поисках-смысла.rar.html
http://turbobit.net/h2kq41cm8hpr.html
http://depositfiles.com/files/jauej6c2c

Blog1
: http://hojja-nusreddin.dreamwidth.org/132134.html
Blog2: http://hojja-nusreddin.livejournal.com/2964208.html
_______________________________________________________

Part 1. To Part 2
: http://hojja-nusreddin.livejournal.com/2964311.html
Tags: divan, english, rumi, диван, перевод, руми, феникс
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