Ходжа Н. (hojja_nusreddin) wrote,
Ходжа Н.
hojja_nusreddin

Americana: LIFE IN 1904

The average life expectancy in America was 47.
Only 14% of the homes in the U.S. had a bathtub.
18% of American households had at least 1 full-time servant or domestic help.
Only 8% of the homes had a telephone.
A 3 minute call from Denver to New York City cost $11.
Sugar cost $0.04/pound. Eggs were $0.14/dozen. Coffee cost $0.15/pound.
There were only 8,000 cars in the U.S. and only 144 miles of paved roads.
The maximum speed limit in most cities was 10 mph.
Alabama, Mississippi, Iowa, and Tennessee were each more heavily populated than California.
With a mere 1.4 million residents, California was only the 21st most populated state in the Union.
The average wage in the U.S. was $0.22/hour.
The average American worker made between $200—$400/year.
A competent specialist could expect to earn:
- accountant $2000/year,
- dentist $2,500/year,
- veterinarian between $1,500—$4,000/year,
- mechanical engineer about $5,000/year.
More than 95% of all births in the U.S. took place at home.
90% of all U.S. physicians had no college education. Instead, they attended medical schools, many of which were condemned in the press and by the government as “substandard.”
5 leading causes of death in the US were:
- pneumonia and influenza
- tuberculosis
- diarrhea
- heart disease
- stroke
The American flag had 45 stars. Arizona, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Hawaii and Alaska hadn’t been admitted to the Union yet.
The population of Las Vegas, Nevada was 30.
1 in 10 American adults couldn’t read or write.
Only 6% of all Americans had graduated from high school.
There were only about 230 reported murders in the entire U.S.
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https://www.garynorth.com/public/18902.cfm
Tags: американа, история, социолухия
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